room2 @ Rundgang 2019


Speaking of the “other” can happen in different forms and dimensions. “Otherness” may include subjects and objects – it all depends on the position of the observer. THE INTERIOR LIVES OF OTHERS is a joint exhibition by Anna Ehrenstein, Will Fredo, Ai Kobayashi, Hend Samy, Bela Usabaev and Myrto Vratsanou, in which the artists engage with perceptions of the “other” and their interiority with diverse working methodologies. 

Anna Ehrenstein’s multimedia installation deals with the embodied manifestation of cultural phenomena in the digital and analogue object. Consisting of lenticular prints, sculptural and textile works “A Lotus is A Lotus” explores the western desire for consumption of difference and the present day circulation, distribution and consumption of exotica.

In addition, Will Fredo’s video installation “Enclosures” questions the meaning and influence of certain buzzwords prominent in global arts circles from the perspective of queer men who live in Chinese metropolises.

Ai Kobayashi’s video work “LIVE ceremony” consists of a recorded one-person performance which deals with the Japanese traditional wedding ceremony and looks at its gender roles.

Hend Samy’s live performance includes spoken word and video where the artist embodies various roles in her nightmares of historically significant events, places and subjects including a repetitious white chicken.

In the durational performance “Just Me. self test 1.”, Bela Usabaev works on breaking a double bind. Inconsistent perception is addressed by meticulous screening, in search for non-fictional facts that are shared with others.

Myrto Vratsanou’s moving image work “Free Immersion Notes” revolves around the non- linear narrations of a bodilless character, she is reflecting on being scattered, connected through digital clutter, hoarding, haunting, glitches and relocations.

While Kurt Heuvens’ still and moving image installation feature his visual travel-log across Germany including subjects whose interiority is speculated. 

Surveillance 102: The Golden Age

Poster by Nikolai Meierjohann

Summer Term 2019: Surveillance 102: The Golden Age

Building on the subject matter covered in Surveillance 101, we take Gilles Deleuze’s “Postscript on the Societies of Control” as a starting point to address contemporary modes of surveillance: algorithmic, fluid, social, multifocal, networked. We’ll look at the different forms that systematic observation takes today and how it can be used towards artistic ends.

Workshops:

Hands-on Surveillance & Counter-Surveillance techniques
Archival practices
Prison field trip (still working on that – seems pretty hard to get in, too)
Mid Term Review: 4./5. June 2019

Readings:

  • Gilles Deleuze – Postscript on the Societies of Control. Very short essay from 1990, available online, e.g. here or here. German translation in the Semesterapparat.
  • Also check out this 20 minute video explaining the core concepts (turn off the music and it’s pretty OK).
  • Shoshana Zuboff – The Age of Surveillance Capitalism. See Semesterapparat. It’s also online already if you know where to look, and pretty cheap to buy at the moment. German translation, too.


Also see all of these from last term (all still of interest):

In the library:

  • Randolph Lewis: Under Surveillance: Being Watched in Modern America
  • CTRL [Space]: Rhetorics of Surveillance, from Bentham to Big Brother, Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, and Peter Weibel, ed. (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002)
  • Surveillance and Security, Technological Politics and Power in Everyday Life. Edited By Toren Monahan
  • Christopher Dandeker, Surveillance,Power & Modernity
  • Newell, Bryce Clayton [editor], Surveillance, Privacy and Public Space
  • Vian Bakir, Sousveillance, media and strategic political communication



Winter Term 2018/19: Surveillance 101 – art work & readings

Readings

Exposed. Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera, 2010, catalogue

Michel Foucault, Discipline and Punish, 1975. English translation freely available online.

Giorgo Agamben: What is an Apparatus?
 (Was ist ein Dispositiv?) PDF available online

Gerhard Paul – „Video“ oder: Was haben die Berliner Verkehrsbetriebe (BVG) mit Homer zu tun?

In the library:

Randolph Lewis: Under Surveillance: Being Watched in Modern America

CTRL [Space]: Rhetorics of Surveillance, from Bentham to Big Brother, Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, and Peter Weibel, ed. (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002)

Surveillance and Security, Technological Politics and Power in Everyday Life. Edited By Toren Monahan

Christopher Dandeker, Surveillance,Power & Modernity

Newell, Bryce Clayton [editor], Surveillance, Privacy and Public Space

Vian Bakir, Sousveillance, media and strategic political communication

Art works shown and discussed

Niels Bonde (seminar guest Nov 14, 2018), I Never had Hair on my Body or Head, 1996

Jonas Mekas, The Brig, 1964

Harun Farocki, Gefängnisbilder (Prison Images), 2000

Artur Zmijewski, Repetition, 2006

Gregor Schneider, Beach Cells, 2007

(20x20x2,5m each cell 4x4x2,5m), Kaldor Art Projects, Bondi Beach, Sydney 28.09.2007-21.10.2007

Lisa Domin – Faxen, 2018

not-to miss all-time favorites

The Conversation, Francis Ford Coppola, 1974

Das Leben der Anderen (The Lives of Others), Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006

The Social Network Trailer, featuring a cover of Radiohead’s Creep

Using CCTV to bring down fascists

The Forensic Architecture team has release another masterful media investigation: THE MURDER OF PAVLOS FYSSAS

Here’s the quick summary. Full video linked below

 

In 2013, members of the Greek Nazi movement “Golden Dawn” murdered the antifascist rapper Pavlos Fyssas on the streets of Athens, a murder that was covered up by members of the Greek police, known to be riddled with Golden Dawn infiltrators, and abetted by Members of Parliament from Golden Dawn.

As the case works its way through the Greek courts, the University of London’s “Forensic Architecture” group has been called in to make sense of a welter of evidence about the crime and the cover-up, deploying their system of using “architectural techniques and technologies to investigate cases of state violence and violations of human rights around the world.”

The result is a 37 minute video that Talos on Metafilter a masterpiece of analytic exposition and impressively recreates the events surrounding the murder based on available data sources — it is.

The Fyssas trial has the potential to bring down Golden Dawn, to bring its true nature as an organized crime group into the open, to eliminate it from the Greek Parliament and to trigger a purge of Nazi elements from the Greek police. It is nothing short of seismic.

But even if you don’t care about any of that, this video is remarkable, a stitching-together of disparate and flawed evidence sources in a way that uses the strengths of one to overlap and fix the weaknesses of the other, creating a coherent and devastating story that is as well-told as any crime drama. It is truly virtuoso work.

Much of the original audio and video material was without an accurate timestamp, and it became apparent that attempts by the Greek police investigators to address this problem were insufficient. As a result, our researchers had to assess the material from scratch, and deduce the correct time and location of each piece of footage.

Audio recordings were assembled into a timed sequence through a process of sound analysis. CCTV footage from various locations around the scene was synchronised and given an accurate timestamp by reference to the sequence of audio recordings.

(via BoingBoing)

Voyeurism

In hidden corners across South Korea, tiny cameras are surreptitiously recording thousands of women when they are at their most vulnerable.

Women have come to fear that cameras could be anywhere: perched inside the toilet bowl of a public restroom, disguised as a smoke detector in a shop’s fitting room, even rolled into a plastic bag at the lip of a trash can.

In Seoul, the capital, the proliferation of such hidden cameras — and the images they record, which often end up on pornographic websites — has often been described by reporters as an epidemic.

The city announced a crackdown on Sunday, increasing the number of municipal employees assigned to search public bathrooms for hidden cameras to 8,000 in October from the 50 currently at work.

“It is to help citizens to feel safe when they use the public restrooms, free from concerns about spy cams,” the Seoul Metropolitan Government said in a statement.

The city has promised to inspect every one of its 20,554 public restrooms daily, an enormous undertaking that underscores the scope of the problem.

NY Times article

 

south-korean-women-protest-against-spy-cam-porn