Voyeurism

In hidden corners across South Korea, tiny cameras are surreptitiously recording thousands of women when they are at their most vulnerable.

Women have come to fear that cameras could be anywhere: perched inside the toilet bowl of a public restroom, disguised as a smoke detector in a shop’s fitting room, even rolled into a plastic bag at the lip of a trash can.

In Seoul, the capital, the proliferation of such hidden cameras — and the images they record, which often end up on pornographic websites — has often been described by reporters as an epidemic.

The city announced a crackdown on Sunday, increasing the number of municipal employees assigned to search public bathrooms for hidden cameras to 8,000 in October from the 50 currently at work.

“It is to help citizens to feel safe when they use the public restrooms, free from concerns about spy cams,” the Seoul Metropolitan Government said in a statement.

The city has promised to inspect every one of its 20,554 public restrooms daily, an enormous undertaking that underscores the scope of the problem.

NY Times article

 

south-korean-women-protest-against-spy-cam-porn

Visiting artist Kerstin Ergenzinger

11:30 h
room2
Wednesday June 6 2018
Visiting sound and space artist Kerstin Ergenzinger will present her work on June 6th at 11:30h in room2.
In the new “Navigating Noise”, “Acts of Orientation” and other works, Kerstin Ergenzinger plays with the sonic as a cultural formatting of sound and more. She’s sonic and holistic and full of techno sonic knowledge.
Figuring out noise is only one side to her multi-pronged work.  The body and perception figure heavily:

“Central themes within Kerstin’s artistic investigations are the inextricable relation between the body and the world, between perception and the perceived, between sensing and sense-making.”

This special visit will include an introduction to her field of sonic architectures. She will detail her research and productions, and describe how she finds and repurposes light, sound, kinetics and traditional media towards farther thinking investigations. New notable achievements can be seen and experienced through her workin installation, electronic arts, sculpture and drawing.

Since 2016 Kerstin Ergenzingerhas been a fellow of the Berlin Center for Advanced Studies at the University of the Arts Berlin where she is working on a two year project called “Rhythmic Textures”. Recent shows include zeich[n]enKunstmuseum Bonn; Acts of Orientation, Schering Stiftung, Berlin; and unREAL: The Agorithmic Present, House of Electronic Arts, Basel and Chronus Arts Center, Shanghai.

Medienkatastrophe: Dirk Baecker – die Kunst der nächsten Gesellschaft

Dirk Baecker on media revolutions and the one we’re currently in. What does it mean for art and the arts when machines start to take part in the communication between humans? What does it mean if you can begin to observe something akin to communication between machines?

As a sociologist, he has written extensively on the subject. See i.e. here or here (in German).

Prof. Dr Dirk Baecker is Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Arts at Witten/Herdecke University and holds a Chair of Culture Theory and Management. Among his key research interests are sociological theory, economic sociology, organisational research and management theories.  Baecker underlines the profound structural and cultural implications of electronic media – from telegraph, radio and TV to computers and the internet – for humans and society, comparable to the introduction of book printing (“modern society”), writing (“advanced civilisations”), and language (“tribal cultures”). According to Baecker, we live in the “next” society, with tremendous distortions between different stages of socio-cultural evolution. *

Tuesday, May 15, 19h, KHM Aula. The talk will be recorded.

https://www.khm.de/termine/news.4311.medienkatastrophe-dirk-baecker-die-kunst-der-naechsten-gesellschaft/

 

poster by Nikolai